Hedge, 2017, archival pigment prints on Hahnemühle Photo Rag Baryta paper, triptych, 105 x 250 cm / 130 x 320 cm

The several-hundred-year-old hedge raises the question of the personal identity of living organisms, the paucity of human perception and the limitation of cognition. How is it possible that we can talk about the same hedge lasting centuries while the assemblage of plants presumably consisting of several, mainly yew trees is in constant change? How can the hedge and the plants constituting it remain themselves all along if their components are constantly replaced, their tiny details look entirely different, and their structure and form are different from what they were earlier? A yew tree is able to grow an aerial root, burry it in the ground and form it into a new trunk. A single tree can repeat this activity even for several thousand years, thus it is very difficult to define the age of certain yew trees. Due to their lifetime spanning several human generations, the Druids regarded yew trees as holy, while in Celtic culture, due to their poisonous leaves and way of proliferation, they symbolised death and resurrection.



Hedge, 2017, archival pigment prints on Hahnemühle Photo Rag Baryta paper, triptych, 105 x 250 cm / 130 x 320 cm, detail



Hedge, 2017, archival pigment prints on Hahnemühle Photo Rag Baryta paper, triptych, 105 x 250 cm / 130 x 320 cm, detail



Hedge, 2017, archival pigment prints on Hahnemühle Photo Rag Baryta paper, triptych, 105 x 250 cm / 130 x 320 cm, detail



installation view: Hypothesis: Everything is Leaf, Robert Capa Contemporary, Budapest, Hungary, 2022



Hedge, 2017, archival pigment prints on Hahnemühle Photo Rag Baryta paper, triptych, 105 x 250 cm / 130 x 320 cm, Installation view: Hypothesis: Everything is Leaf, Foto Wien, Atelier Augarten, Vienna, Austria, 2022